Revamping the Secondary Education in India: A Journey from Independence to National Education Policy (NEP) 2020

Shaweta Miglani *

Department of Education and Community Service, Punjabi University, Patiala- 147002, India and Department of Education, Central University of Punjab, Bathinda-151401, India.

Shankar Lal Bika

Department of Education, Central University of Punjab, Bathinda-151401, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

In the dynamic landscape of developing nations, secondary school education emerges as a pivotal policy focus after being the most neglected segment of school education for a long, marking a significant juncture in the educational trajectory. With primary education achieving widespread accessibility and nearly 100% enrollment, attention gradually shifted to the adolescent demographic, focusing on secondary school education. This paper undertakes a comprehensive examination and critical evaluation of the evolution of secondary school education in India since its independence. Commencing with the seminal Board of Secondary Education report of 1948, traversing through significant milestones like Mudaliar Commission, Kothari Commission, NPE-1986, CABE Committee Report, National Knowledge Commission, RMSA and finally culminating in the landmark National Education Policy 2020, it traverses through the numerous initiatives shaping the present landscape of secondary schooling in the nation. Emphasizing key milestones and recommendations put forth by various commissions, the article offers an insightful analysis of the implementation and efficacy of these measures. The paper attempts to meticulously scrutinize and thoroughly analyze the major commissions and their recommendations, illuminating the successes and shortcomings in attaining the prescribed objectives within the secondary education sphere.

Keywords: Secondary school education, India, secondary education commission, NEP 2020


How to Cite

Miglani, Shaweta, and Shankar Lal Bika. 2024. “Revamping the Secondary Education in India: A Journey from Independence to National Education Policy (NEP) 2020”. Asian Journal of Education and Social Studies 50 (7):518-29. https://doi.org/10.9734/ajess/2024/v50i71482.

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