Language Policy Dynamics in Early Childhood Education through Basil Bernstein’s Lens

Mwansa Mukalula-Kalumbi

University of Zambia, Zambia.

Agnes Chileshe Chibamba

University of Zambia, Zambia.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

This paper examined the implementation of local language policy in privately owned early childhood centers through Bernstein’s lens theory. It focuses on the benefits and implications of using local languages as media of instruction in early grades drawing on Basil Bernstein’s framing and control lens. This study is qualitative in nature and it used descriptive research design to examine the implementation of local language policy in privately owned early childhood centers through Bernstein’s lens theory. Simple random sampling technique was used to select ten (10) privately owned centers and ten (10) teachers that formed the sample. Ten (10) center managers were purposely selected bringing the total number of participants to twenty (20).

The study used participant and non-participant observation and interviews to collect data and a total of 10 lessons were observed with a focus on the language of the instruction used. The results of the study show that there are major divides that linger among the classes in society which are visible in geographical locations of schools and have a great influence on the language of instruction. The results further show that local languages are not taught in private schools due to limitations in language command and skill set required to adequately teach. The study recommends that the pre service training programs should equip early childhood education teachers with adequate skills in local language teaching. Further, there is need for wider consultation with all stakeholders if issues of medium of instruction are to be a consensus at pre-grade.

Keywords: Private schools, early childhood, education, education language policy, local language


How to Cite

Mukalula-Kalumbi, Mwansa, and Agnes Chileshe Chibamba. 2024. “Language Policy Dynamics in Early Childhood Education through Basil Bernstein’s Lens”. Asian Journal of Education and Social Studies 50 (7):486-93. https://doi.org/10.9734/ajess/2024/v50i71478.

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