Open Access Original Research Article

Analysis of Factors Influencing Household Preference Level for Seafood in Southwest Nigeria

Olaniran Anthony Thompson

Asian Journal of Education and Social Studies, Page 1-10
DOI: 10.9734/ajess/2021/v23i230549

Seafood is known worldwide as a very important component of human diet because of its high nutritive value and significance in improving human health. The study examines the factors influencing households’ preference level for seafood and determines the factors inducing the choice of seafood consumption by households in Southwest Nigeria. Multi-stage sampling technique was used to select 300 households in Oyo and Lagos States, Southwest Nigeria. Ordered probit regression model was used to examine the factors influencing household preference level for seafood and multinomial logistic model was used to determine the factors inducing the choice of seafood consumed by the households in the study area. The ordered probit model estimation results revealed that access to seafood within 1km – 4km was significant at 5% and positively relates to household preference for seafood. Increase in income of the household will increase the likelihood of having high preference for seafood (14.39%) by the respondents in the study area. Multinomial logistic model results revealed that the education level of the respondents influenced the choice of croaker fish by 12.01% relative to shrimp in the study area. Therefore, the study recommends that seafood marketers should ensure a good distribution network that will enhance its accessibility within one and four kilometers in the study area.

Open Access Original Research Article

English Language Teachers’ Beliefs and Practices Concerning Continuous Assessment in Omani Cycle 1 Schools

Khalsa Khalaf Said Al-Harrasi, Serge Gabarre, Chaharazed Mirza

Asian Journal of Education and Social Studies, Page 11-27
DOI: 10.9734/ajess/2021/v23i230550

Aims: In this study, the authors investigated English language teachers’ beliefs on continuous assessment, the relationship between their beliefs and continuous assessment practices, and factors influencing teachers’ continuous assessment practices in Cycle 1 schools in the South Batinah Governorate in the Sultanate of Oman.

Study Design: The authors used a mixed-methods approach employing an explanatory sequential design. In the first phase, a questionnaire investigating teachers’ beliefs and assessment practices was distributed to 154 teachers. In the second phase, interviews and artefact observation were conducted with three teachers. Principal components analysis was used to analyze questionnaire data, whereas interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis.

Results: The results indicate that teachers demonstrate positive beliefs towards the implementation of continuous assessment. They highlighted some aspects of the benefits of continuous assessment such as providing feedback to learners and parents and encouraging teachers to use a variety of methods, reflect on their assessment practices and adapt their techniques. However, discrepancies were found between teachers’ reported beliefs and their continuous assessment practices. These discrepancies resulted from large class size, lack of time, syllabus and timetable load, mixed learner abilities, lack of clarity of the assessment handbook, parents’ attitudes, and inadequate assessment training.

Conclusion: The study is significant because it helps clarify the relationship between teachers’ beliefs and their assessment practices. In addition, the study provides information for policymakers, assessment designers, and training program designers on the current implementation of continuous assessment in Cycle 1. The study significantly contributes to the existing literature since to the best of the authors’ knowledge it is the first study conducted in Oman investigating teachers’ beliefs on the practices of continuous assessment in Cycle 1 schools.

Open Access Original Research Article

Relationship among Emotional Intelligence, Self-Efficacy and Academic Achievement of Secondary School Students in Mathematics in Imo State

C. N. Nwokolo, I. C. Ahaneku

Asian Journal of Education and Social Studies, Page 28-36
DOI: 10.9734/ajess/2021/v23i230551

Aims: The study determined the type of relationship between emotional intelligence and academic achievement of secondary school students, the type of relationship between self-efficacy and academic achievement of secondary school students, the type of joint relationship among emotional intelligence, self-efficacy and academic achievement of secondary school students in Mathematics in Imo state.

Study Design: Correlational Survey research design.

Place and Duration of Study: Secondary school II students in Imo State, Nigeria Sample:

Methodology: The study adopted the correlation survey design. Disproportionate stratified sampling technique was used to select a sample size of 1250 SS II students from a population of 6960 SS II students in government owned secondary schools in Imo state. The instruments adopted for data collection were standardized emotional intelligence inventory (EI) and self-efficacy scale (SES). These instruments were administered using direct delivery approach with the help of regular teachers as research assistants from the sampled schools. Research questions 1 and 2 were analyzed using Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient, while research question 3 was analyzed using multiple regression analysis. The hypotheses postulated was tested at 0.05 level of significance using multiple regression analysis which determined the R, R-squared and adjusted R-squared. The significant value on the coefficient table was used to test hypotheses 1 and 2, while the ANOVA F-ratio, R, R-squared and adjusted R-squared coefficients derived from multiple regression analysis were used to test hypotheses 3.

Results: The findings of the study revealed a moderate positive relationship of 0.643 existing between secondary school students’ emotional intelligence and their academic achievement in Mathematics, Also, a very low positive relationship of 0.310 existing between secondary school students’ self-efficacy and their academic achievement in Mathematics, a moderate positive relationship of 0.451 existing among secondary school students’ emotional intelligence, self-efficacy jointly with their academic achievement in Mathematics. Furthermore, a significant relationship between emotional intelligence and academic achievement of secondary school students in Mathematics in Imo state. There is a significant relationship between self-efficacy and academic achievement of secondary school students in Mathematics in Imo state. There is a significant relationship existing among secondary school students’ emotional intelligence and self-efficacy jointly with their academic achievement in Mathematics in Imo state.

Conclusion: The conclusion of this study creates an insight on the possible reasons for poor academic achievement in accordance with their personality traits and have provided justification for the expressed concerns.

Open Access Original Research Article

Conceptual Developments in Environmental Law: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Santiago M. Álvarez Carreño

Asian Journal of Education and Social Studies, Page 37-47
DOI: 10.9734/ajess/2021/v23i230552

This paper’s point of view is that environmental law translates this particular evolutionary point in time into principles and rules, and highlights that given the extent and significance of the grave issues we are confronting, concepts that come from other sciences need to be dealt with carefully to ensure these are interpreted and implemented effectively. The grave concern about conservation of the environment and the urgent need for effective measures to protect it is a sign of the times, and it is growing deeper in view of the rapidly worsening climate crisis. Environmental law studies demonstrate that there is a line of force based on fluid, fruitful dialogue between different fields of knowledge. Lawyers are aware of the achievements made in environmental law, as well as its manifest deficiencies and limitations, and, just like Theseus who momentarily loses the golden thread offered by the bold Ariadne, they must find a way out of that labyrinth.

Open Access Original Research Article

Sources of Variations in the Kenyan Sign Language and its Effects on Academic Performance of Students in Hearing Impairment Schools. A Case Study

Jebet K. Sheila, Asakhulu N. Mukolwe, Mutai K. Paul

Asian Journal of Education and Social Studies, Page 48-62
DOI: 10.9734/ajess/2021/v23i230553

Sign language is a system of communication that uses manual alphabets, hand gestures, facial expressions and finger spelling to convey meaning. It is used in communication as well as instructional language during teaching and learning process. However, there are variations in sign language worldwide and Kenya is no exception. The variations in sign language may affect academic performance among students in secondary school for the hearing impairment (HI). This study aimed at to identifying the sources of variations and the effects of variations on academic performance of students in HI schools. The study was guided by the ecological system theory of human development. Descriptive research design was employed. The target population of the study was 17 secondary schools for HI students, 589 form four students and 189 teachers. Two questionnaires were used, one for the teachers and the other for the HI students. A pilot study was conducted to assess the validity and reliability of research instruments. Data was analyzed descriptively with the help of SPSS version 25. The results were presented in tables and figures in form frequencies and percentages. Results from the respondents established that there were variations in the KSL which were brought about by the family background, the teachers’ interactions, peers and friends, the curriculum and also regional variations. It was also established that the variations affected the way the students receive and respond to various concepts during teaching and learning process which affected their academic performance. The study concluded that there were variations in the KSL, which influenced students’ academic performance. The researcher recommends that curriculum developers should consider these findings and align the curriculum to reduce variations. Curriculum developers to use the media to teach the community on the appropriate signs used for communication in Kenya more in service courses for the trained teachers to all other teachers to get the basic sign languages used in Kenya.